JORDAN FROSOLONE

headshot.jpg

Born and raised in Chicago, Jordan’s career in food began in 1998 working for notable area restaurants such as Coco Pazzo, Blackbird, and NoMi. With a deep passion for Italian cuisine, Jordan moved to Italy in 2002 and worked in restaurants in both Spoleto and Florence. With refined skills and deeper culinary aptitude, Jordan moved back to the United States in 2003 and spent one year with the culinary team at Bouley before joining Marco Canora at Hearth as a line cook. Showing great promise and genuine talent, Jordan was promoted to Chef de Cuisine in 2006 and remained there until 2011 before joining the team at August as Executive Chef. Not long after, Jordan left the pass to join David Chang’s Momofuku group as Director of Culinary Operations. He spent the next two years traveling throughout New York and Canada overseeing culinary programming and opening three new restaurants in Toronto. Feeling a pull back to the kitchen, Jordan left Momofuku in 2014 to become Executive Chef at Sessanta in Soho. Jordan is currently the Executive Chef at 10 Corso Como Restaurant and Café in New York City. Since 2011, Jordan has been working with farmers, producers, and travel agencies teaching cooking classes and hosting culinary tours in the Tuscany, Puglia and Sicily regions of Italy. Frosolone currently resides in Brooklyn with his wife, Emily, and two children, Zanghi and Elio, and practices Seido and Kyokushin karate in his spare time.

What tasting are you presenting? How is this dish a celebration of rice?

My tasting is Risotto allo Zafferano-

  • Italy is the largest producer of rice in Europe

  • Leonardo da Vinci is known for his contribution to the building of channels to drain the marshlands of the Po river plains.

  • The Italians do not eat much rice (about 8.5 kg/person in 2000), but Italy is famous for its risotto and a number of rice varieties have been developed for this purpose, especially Arborio and Carnaroli

  • The most famous Italian rice dish is Risotto alla Milanese. According to tradition, the dish was concocted during the construction of the famous Milan cathedral at the beginning of 16th Century. Saffron was introduced to colour the stained glass windows of the cathedral, and was added to a risotto dish only as a joke

What does the future of Asian food look like?

Asian food, in my opinion,  is and will continue to be, the most influential cuisines to impact the future of cooking and dining. 

What does celebrating 10 lucky years of LUCKYRICE mean to you?

It is a true honor to be associated with such an amazing and passionate organization and to work with so many smart and thoughtful people.

Join Chef Frosolone at our 10th year celebrations at LUCKYRICE Feast presented by Rémy Martin on Thursday, September 26th, 2019 in New York City

 
 
ChineseLUCKYRICE2018, DC, Breaking Bao